Project summary


Populations of lapwing, curlew and snipe have declined at an alarming rate over the last 30 years and despite many years of effort more work is needed to reverse these startling declines. Working for Waders brings together a programme of work to support the recovers of breeding wader populations in the South West Peak.

This programme will use a refreshed approach, integrating applied PhD research, evidence-based interventions, biodiversity monitoring, social science, ecosystem services and innovative new techniques. The fresh focus of this project is landscape-wide and will fill vital knowledge gaps, improve collaborations with landowners and test how we can effect change.

Programmes of habitat interventions, monitoring of breeding birds and collection of data at the farm level will all be used to inform what changes are needed at a broader, landscape scale.

Working for Waders project areas will be sited in priority areas for breeding waders, where there are strong wader populations requiring interventions, and/or significant opportunities to improve habitats and attract larger populations of target species.

One of the key elements of this project is to implement tailored wader plans for farmers within the priority areas. These plans will identify the need for further habitat interventions on individual farms. The project will consist of volunteer Wader Wardens and will work closely with South West Peak Landscape partnership Farm Link Workers to support farmers participating in this effort to help our waders.

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What we're doing

  • Boosting resilience of lapwing, curlew and snipe populations in the South West Peak
  • Training local volunteers as Wader Wardens to learn about the importance of breeding waders
  • Forming relationships with farmers and supporting their efforts to help wader populations
  • Improving wader habitats across three Priority Areas in the South West Peak
  • Reducing the environmental impacts of land management throughout the region

Dive on in and learn more about the wading birds of the South West Peak!

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Snipe are present in the South West Peak all year round; listen out for the 'drumming' sound that snipe make with their tail feathers.

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Who's working on this project?


Andrew Farmer

Andrew Farmer

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Jack N

Jack Norris

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Leah Kelly

Leah Kelly

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Our partners


  • Natural England
  • Peak District National Park Authority
  • RSPB
  • Staffordshire Wildlife Trusts